Management
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PROP Nutrition Management Guidelines
First Edition
March 2017, v.1.2
Updated: September 2017
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Benefits and Harms of Implementing the Recommendations
Overview

intercurrent illness, stress, injury or surgery can trigger a catabolic event leading to increases in propionate metabolites and ammonia.  Unless immediate intervention with reversal of catabolism are undertaken, patients with PROP run the risk of damage to their central nervous system that can be manifested in motor, intellectual and/or behavioral impairment. Outcome is therefore dependent on early diagnosis with initiation of treatment, appropriate treatment during catabolic events, and consistent treatment and monitoring to maintain appropriate plasma amino acids, ammonia, growth and health maintenance.

Potential Harms

Inappropriate intake of medical food can impact growth, nutritional status and overall health. Excessive intake of foods with intact protein can, cause metabolic decompensation, and have an impact on the central nervous system. Over-restriction of propiogenic amino acids can impact growth and development. Pregnancy in a woman with PROP involves not only the typical PROP management, but also the increased needs of the pregnancy, the health of the fetus, the management of pregnancy-related illnesses and the rapid catabolic changes that occur after delivery. Liver transplantation may allow an individual with PROP to consume more intact protein, but without nutritional counseling during the transition, nutrient needs may not be met.

Lack of appropriate nutrition management can result in negative consequences. This can be the result of implementing only some of the recommendations, failing to monitor outcomes, and failing to adjust nutrient intake in response to growth or illness.

  • Inappropriate intake of medical food can impact growth and nutritional status and overall health.
  • Excessive intake of leucine has been related to low plasma concentrations of ILE  and VAL
  • Excessive intake of foods with intact protein can, cause metabolic decompensation, and have an impact on the central nervous system.
  • Over-restriction of propiogenic amino acids can impact growth and development.
  • Pregnancy in a woman with PROP involves not only the typical PROP management, but also the increased needs of the pregnancy, the health of the fetus, the management of pregnancy-related illnesses and the rapid catabolic changes that occur after delivery.
  • During illness, catabolism increases the endogenous production of propiogenic amino acids and puts the individual at high risk for metabolic decompensation.
  • Liver transplantation may allow an individual with PROP to consume more intact protein, but without nutritional counseling during the transition, nutrient needs may not be met.
Potential Benefits

Implementing the recommendations would:

  • Reduce variations in clinical practice and services across medical centers
  • Guide practice decisions that integrate medical and nutrition management/therapy
  • Provide clinicians with criteria to make recommendations for nutrition management or recommend other treatments to achieve outcomes
  • Design quality nutrition care based on a patient’s metabolic and/or genetic alteration
  • Improve patient outcomes and clinician effectiveness
  • Enhance patient quality of life, prevent untoward consequences and complications and reduce associated medical, educational and social costs.
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